The Whisky Market

It's all about whisky!

Investing & Growing Value of Whisky

Investing & Growing Value of Whisky

Investing in whisky casks in today’s market is quickly gaining speed and interest.

The golden and ruby hue of single malts is turning into a rich green as investor clamor evermore to own Scottish liquid gold. The Whisky Market Limited is at the forefront in selecting choice matured casks and laying down ‘new make’ in ex-fill; bourbon, red wine, and sherry.

The Whisky Market Limited is seeing a steady 7-10% annual return on casks, and our associate company over the past 3 years has seen a staggering 11-123% increase in value. The rate of return is based on the distillery, type of cask, age, and rarity. Investing in casks has great advantages for return on investment and the rare added value of saying you are the proud owner of a casks of whisky! The rise of independent bottlers and investors seeking out casks means the investment will always have a buyer. Unless of course you choose to bottle it and maybe share with the lucky ones!

It was only a few years ago that the first cask of whisky sold at auction. Setting a world record; a Macallan 25 year old at $793.000 HK. This has prompted a growing interest in other auction houses to venture into the selling casks. Most recently in June 2015, Christie’s of London included two casks in the Fine Wine & Spirits Auction. Five specialty whisky auction houses cater to this sector of selling rare expressions of whisky, predominantly bottles but casks are beginning to emerge.

The industry is growing with an influx of buyers and sellers all vying to capitalise on their growing interest in tasty casks. What whisky enthusiast or prudent investor would not want to declare they own a cask(s) of Scotland’s signature export!

 

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Don't whine about wine casks!

Don't whine about wine casks!

Don’t whine about wine Casks!

Wine casks in the whisky industry are becoming ever more present in single malts. This is the discussion of red, white, and sweet wine casks such as Sauternes, Bordeaux, Barolo, Pinot Noir, and not the equally delicious fortified wines like; Sherry, Porto, Madeira.

It may come as a surprise that usage of wine casks in the Scotch industry is not a new edition. Historically wine casks have been used in the whisky industry for a long, long time even when it was dominated by sherry. Stemming back to when casks of wine would be shipped to Scotland or England to be bottled locally and the used casks would be gobbled up by the distilleries for maturation. It is true that at this time the casks were not chosen specifically but were taken based on availability.

The new growing trend or experimentation, is to select specific quality wine casks to bring a variant flavour profile to the Whisky. This has been producing great results. An added bonus is the fact that these casks are readily available from wineries and at a much lower cost. They are being used for finishing, full maturation, and as part maturation. Which process they are used for depends on the experienced palate of the Malt Master.

Using these types of casks gives a new dimension to the spirit from the particular oak used. French oak is a common occurrence with wine casks, which does vary in character from an American oak giving the spirit a spicy, less sweet, and silky tannin structure. Given the multitude of wine grape assemblages be it dry, sweet or robust the variance of expressions is massive.

This was recently experienced at a lowland distillery which had a 9 year old fully matured in a red Bordeaux casks. The expression was a lovely, full character of French oak and a fine red wine. The Whisky Market Ltd has some tasty Tullibardine resting in some fine red Grands Crus … sadly not ready yet, but maturing fabulously … We cannot wait!

Characters: Dry, fruity, smoother tannins, ruby colour, robust, honey

There are various distilleries that are releasing wine cask finished whisky, which is gradually gaining more admiration by single malts drinkers. Be it a sweeter finish of a sauternes or a more robust profile from a heavy red wine …. How could you not like it or be curious?

 

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